Is bacteria singular or plural

Is bacteria singular or plural?

A single creature is a bacterium.
A cluster of them is bacteria.
You do, however, hear English speakers say "bacterias," but they don't mean simply more than one bacterium.
They mean it as a shorthand for something like "cultures of bacteria," or "several species of bacteria," ("She's infected by several bacterias").
In formal writing it would be best to avoid "bacterias," and use what you specifically mean, but in speech, telling your lab partner the three petri dishes of bacteria are over there by gesturing and saying "The bacterias are over there" is fine.

Technically, bacterium is singular and bacteria is plural.
This isn’t widely understood or followed, though, so according to general usage, “bacteria” ends up being used for both singular and plural.
It’s a bit like vertebrae.
Vertebrae is plural for vertebra, but some people seem to think that one is still “a vertebrae.
” Not worth fighting over in most cases, except with grammarians, lexicographers, and Latin teachers.

Singularly, you should say bacterium.
But saying bacteria, you therefore are refereing to many of the bacterium.
Singular = bacterium
Plural = bacteria

Is bacteria singular or plural?

A single creature is a bacterium.
A cluster of them is bacteria.
You do, however, hear English speakers say "bacterias," but they don't mean simply more than one bacterium.
They mean it as a shorthand for something like "cultures of bacteria," or "several species of bacteria," ("She's infected by several bacterias").
In formal writing it would be best to avoid "bacterias," and use what you specifically mean, but in speech, telling your lab partner the three petri dishes of bacteria are over there by gesturing and saying "The bacterias are over there" is fine.

Technically, bacterium is singular and bacteria is plural.
This isn’t widely understood or followed, though, so according to general usage, “bacteria” ends up being used for both singular and plural.
It’s a bit like vertebrae.
Vertebrae is plural for vertebra, but some people seem to think that one is still “a vertebrae.
” Not worth fighting over in most cases, except with grammarians, lexicographers, and Latin teachers.

Singularly, you should say bacterium.
But saying bacteria, you therefore are refereing to many of the bacterium.
Singular = bacterium
Plural = bacteria

Is bacteria singular or plural?

A single creature is a bacterium.
A cluster of them is bacteria.
You do, however, hear English speakers say "bacterias," but they don't mean simply more than one bacterium.
They mean it as a shorthand for something like "cultures of bacteria," or "several species of bacteria," ("She's infected by several bacterias").
In formal writing it would be best to avoid "bacterias," and use what you specifically mean, but in speech, telling your lab partner the three petri dishes of bacteria are over there by gesturing and saying "The bacterias are over there" is fine.

Technically, bacterium is singular and bacteria is plural.
This isn’t widely understood or followed, though, so according to general usage, “bacteria” ends up being used for both singular and plural.
It’s a bit like vertebrae.
Vertebrae is plural for vertebra, but some people seem to think that one is still “a vertebrae.
” Not worth fighting over in most cases, except with grammarians, lexicographers, and Latin teachers.

Singularly, you should say bacterium.
But saying bacteria, you therefore are refereing to many of the bacterium.
Singular = bacterium
Plural = bacteria

Is bacteria singular or plural?

A single creature is a bacterium.
A cluster of them is bacteria.
You do, however, hear English speakers say "bacterias," but they don't mean simply more than one bacterium.
They mean it as a shorthand for something like "cultures of bacteria," or "several species of bacteria," ("She's infected by several bacterias").
In formal writing it would be best to avoid "bacterias," and use what you specifically mean, but in speech, telling your lab partner the three petri dishes of bacteria are over there by gesturing and saying "The bacterias are over there" is fine.

Technically, bacterium is singular and bacteria is plural.
This isn’t widely understood or followed, though, so according to general usage, “bacteria” ends up being used for both singular and plural.
It’s a bit like vertebrae.
Vertebrae is plural for vertebra, but some people seem to think that one is still “a vertebrae.
” Not worth fighting over in most cases, except with grammarians, lexicographers, and Latin teachers.

Singularly, you should say bacterium.
But saying bacteria, you therefore are refereing to many of the bacterium.
Singular = bacterium
Plural = bacteria

Is bacteria singular or plural?

A single creature is a bacterium.
A cluster of them is bacteria.
You do, however, hear English speakers say "bacterias," but they don't mean simply more than one bacterium.
They mean it as a shorthand for something like "cultures of bacteria," or "several species of bacteria," ("She's infected by several bacterias").
In formal writing it would be best to avoid "bacterias," and use what you specifically mean, but in speech, telling your lab partner the three petri dishes of bacteria are over there by gesturing and saying "The bacterias are over there" is fine.

Technically, bacterium is singular and bacteria is plural.
This isn’t widely understood or followed, though, so according to general usage, “bacteria” ends up being used for both singular and plural.
It’s a bit like vertebrae.
Vertebrae is plural for vertebra, but some people seem to think that one is still “a vertebrae.
” Not worth fighting over in most cases, except with grammarians, lexicographers, and Latin teachers.

Singularly, you should say bacterium.
But saying bacteria, you therefore are refereing to many of the bacterium.
Singular = bacterium
Plural = bacteria

Is bacteria singular or plural?

A single creature is a bacterium.
A cluster of them is bacteria.
You do, however, hear English speakers say "bacterias," but they don't mean simply more than one bacterium.
They mean it as a shorthand for something like "cultures of bacteria," or "several species of bacteria," ("She's infected by several bacterias").
In formal writing it would be best to avoid "bacterias," and use what you specifically mean, but in speech, telling your lab partner the three petri dishes of bacteria are over there by gesturing and saying "The bacterias are over there" is fine.

Technically, bacterium is singular and bacteria is plural.
This isn’t widely understood or followed, though, so according to general usage, “bacteria” ends up being used for both singular and plural.
It’s a bit like vertebrae.
Vertebrae is plural for vertebra, but some people seem to think that one is still “a vertebrae.
” Not worth fighting over in most cases, except with grammarians, lexicographers, and Latin teachers.

Singularly, you should say bacterium.
But saying bacteria, you therefore are refereing to many of the bacterium.
Singular = bacterium
Plural = bacteria

Is bacteria singular or plural?

A single creature is a bacterium.
A cluster of them is bacteria.
You do, however, hear English speakers say "bacterias," but they don't mean simply more than one bacterium.
They mean it as a shorthand for something like "cultures of bacteria," or "several species of bacteria," ("She's infected by several bacterias").
In formal writing it would be best to avoid "bacterias," and use what you specifically mean, but in speech, telling your lab partner the three petri dishes of bacteria are over there by gesturing and saying "The bacterias are over there" is fine.

Technically, bacterium is singular and bacteria is plural.
This isn’t widely understood or followed, though, so according to general usage, “bacteria” ends up being used for both singular and plural.
It’s a bit like vertebrae.
Vertebrae is plural for vertebra, but some people seem to think that one is still “a vertebrae.
” Not worth fighting over in most cases, except with grammarians, lexicographers, and Latin teachers.

Singularly, you should say bacterium.
But saying bacteria, you therefore are refereing to many of the bacterium.
Singular = bacterium
Plural = bacteria

Is bacteria singular or plural?

A single creature is a bacterium.
A cluster of them is bacteria.
You do, however, hear English speakers say "bacterias," but they don't mean simply more than one bacterium.
They mean it as a shorthand for something like "cultures of bacteria," or "several species of bacteria," ("She's infected by several bacterias").
In formal writing it would be best to avoid "bacterias," and use what you specifically mean, but in speech, telling your lab partner the three petri dishes of bacteria are over there by gesturing and saying "The bacterias are over there" is fine.

Technically, bacterium is singular and bacteria is plural.
This isn’t widely understood or followed, though, so according to general usage, “bacteria” ends up being used for both singular and plural.
It’s a bit like vertebrae.
Vertebrae is plural for vertebra, but some people seem to think that one is still “a vertebrae.
” Not worth fighting over in most cases, except with grammarians, lexicographers, and Latin teachers.

Singularly, you should say bacterium.
But saying bacteria, you therefore are refereing to many of the bacterium.
Singular = bacterium
Plural = bacteria

Is bacteria singular or plural?

A single creature is a bacterium.
A cluster of them is bacteria.
You do, however, hear English speakers say "bacterias," but they don't mean simply more than one bacterium.
They mean it as a shorthand for something like "cultures of bacteria," or "several species of bacteria," ("She's infected by several bacterias").
In formal writing it would be best to avoid "bacterias," and use what you specifically mean, but in speech, telling your lab partner the three petri dishes of bacteria are over there by gesturing and saying "The bacterias are over there" is fine.

Technically, bacterium is singular and bacteria is plural.
This isn’t widely understood or followed, though, so according to general usage, “bacteria” ends up being used for both singular and plural.
It’s a bit like vertebrae.
Vertebrae is plural for vertebra, but some people seem to think that one is still “a vertebrae.
” Not worth fighting over in most cases, except with grammarians, lexicographers, and Latin teachers.

Singularly, you should say bacterium.
But saying bacteria, you therefore are refereing to many of the bacterium.
Singular = bacterium
Plural = bacteria

Is bacteria singular or plural?

A single creature is a bacterium.
A cluster of them is bacteria.
You do, however, hear English speakers say "bacterias," but they don't mean simply more than one bacterium.
They mean it as a shorthand for something like "cultures of bacteria," or "several species of bacteria," ("She's infected by several bacterias").
In formal writing it would be best to avoid "bacterias," and use what you specifically mean, but in speech, telling your lab partner the three petri dishes of bacteria are over there by gesturing and saying "The bacterias are over there" is fine.

Technically, bacterium is singular and bacteria is plural.
This isn’t widely understood or followed, though, so according to general usage, “bacteria” ends up being used for both singular and plural.
It’s a bit like vertebrae.
Vertebrae is plural for vertebra, but some people seem to think that one is still “a vertebrae.
” Not worth fighting over in most cases, except with grammarians, lexicographers, and Latin teachers.

Singularly, you should say bacterium.
But saying bacteria, you therefore are refereing to many of the bacterium.
Singular = bacterium
Plural = bacteria

Updated: 09.07.2019 — 2:51 pm

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