In what ways does physics change your world view

In what ways does physics change your world view?

Most of physics is mind-blowingly counter-intuitive.
Oftentimes you learn things in physics and you think ‘No, that can’t be.
Can it? It can’t be.
’ And yet the proofs of the things that do not seem to make sense, both theoretical and experimental, are simple, clear, and totally incontrovertible.
So physics shows that there are so many more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy – including bits that go so starkly against the grain of what your instincts and common sense would have you assume or believe, that you are led to question everything, including yourself.
You then realize that the whole process of evolution that culminated in you did not equip you to have an instinct or a feel for the truth; it equipped you to survive in a difficult world, at the cost of an extremely coarse and often plain wrong inner model of reality.
In short, physics makes you apprehend the nature of reality as it is, not the way survival imperatives conditioned you to believe.
It also shows who you can become, a very different human from where your pedestrian but mindless biological heritage would have led you.

Imagine that you live your whole life thinking habitually.
Things either exist, or they don't exist.
An event is either earlier, at the same as, or later than another event.
No matter how you look at things, they are what they are.
As you sit there smugly in your certitude, I offer you one of three pills:
Any one of these pills will do exactly this: disabuse you of the idea that these habits of fact are anything other than habits acquired by upbringing, and evolved to allow you to cope with, maintain, and replicate, a humdrum life.
And this banality is important.
I’d hate for the town’s food supply, or my airline flight, to be under the control of a philosopher, a physicist, or Timothy Leary.
But because 99% of us consent to a humdrum existence, which begets and depends on a humdrum way of seeing the world, society has the luxury of allowing 1% of us to experience different habits of thoughts, and the different perspectives on reality that they reveal to us.
What a hoot!
PS: Of the three pills above, I prefer philosophy.
Physics: too much math.
LSD: too many chemicals.
But others would say, philosophy: too many words.
To each their own.

I just started studying physics at university a year ago, it makes me ask a lot more questions about just why everything works the way it does.
I'm starting to see the world in a more mathematical way and sometimes already seem to over complexify simple problems.
I often feel like I'm changing, I'm becoming more forgetful of simple everyday tasks, more and more clumsy which bothers me quite a bit.
My brain seems to be overwritten with math.
As for a philosopher, i don't see a lot of contribution coming from a physics study, as its 90% dry mathematics.
But there's a lot more to come, I'm just at the start of it and would probably write a completely different answer once I'm finished.

In what ways does physics change your world view?

Most of physics is mind-blowingly counter-intuitive.
Oftentimes you learn things in physics and you think ‘No, that can’t be.
Can it? It can’t be.
’ And yet the proofs of the things that do not seem to make sense, both theoretical and experimental, are simple, clear, and totally incontrovertible.
So physics shows that there are so many more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy – including bits that go so starkly against the grain of what your instincts and common sense would have you assume or believe, that you are led to question everything, including yourself.
You then realize that the whole process of evolution that culminated in you did not equip you to have an instinct or a feel for the truth; it equipped you to survive in a difficult world, at the cost of an extremely coarse and often plain wrong inner model of reality.
In short, physics makes you apprehend the nature of reality as it is, not the way survival imperatives conditioned you to believe.
It also shows who you can become, a very different human from where your pedestrian but mindless biological heritage would have led you.

Imagine that you live your whole life thinking habitually.
Things either exist, or they don't exist.
An event is either earlier, at the same as, or later than another event.
No matter how you look at things, they are what they are.
As you sit there smugly in your certitude, I offer you one of three pills:
Any one of these pills will do exactly this: disabuse you of the idea that these habits of fact are anything other than habits acquired by upbringing, and evolved to allow you to cope with, maintain, and replicate, a humdrum life.
And this banality is important.
I’d hate for the town’s food supply, or my airline flight, to be under the control of a philosopher, a physicist, or Timothy Leary.
But because 99% of us consent to a humdrum existence, which begets and depends on a humdrum way of seeing the world, society has the luxury of allowing 1% of us to experience different habits of thoughts, and the different perspectives on reality that they reveal to us.
What a hoot!
PS: Of the three pills above, I prefer philosophy.
Physics: too much math.
LSD: too many chemicals.
But others would say, philosophy: too many words.
To each their own.

I just started studying physics at university a year ago, it makes me ask a lot more questions about just why everything works the way it does.
I'm starting to see the world in a more mathematical way and sometimes already seem to over complexify simple problems.
I often feel like I'm changing, I'm becoming more forgetful of simple everyday tasks, more and more clumsy which bothers me quite a bit.
My brain seems to be overwritten with math.
As for a philosopher, i don't see a lot of contribution coming from a physics study, as its 90% dry mathematics.
But there's a lot more to come, I'm just at the start of it and would probably write a completely different answer once I'm finished.

In what ways does physics change your world view?

Most of physics is mind-blowingly counter-intuitive.
Oftentimes you learn things in physics and you think ‘No, that can’t be.
Can it? It can’t be.
’ And yet the proofs of the things that do not seem to make sense, both theoretical and experimental, are simple, clear, and totally incontrovertible.
So physics shows that there are so many more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy – including bits that go so starkly against the grain of what your instincts and common sense would have you assume or believe, that you are led to question everything, including yourself.
You then realize that the whole process of evolution that culminated in you did not equip you to have an instinct or a feel for the truth; it equipped you to survive in a difficult world, at the cost of an extremely coarse and often plain wrong inner model of reality.
In short, physics makes you apprehend the nature of reality as it is, not the way survival imperatives conditioned you to believe.
It also shows who you can become, a very different human from where your pedestrian but mindless biological heritage would have led you.

Imagine that you live your whole life thinking habitually.
Things either exist, or they don't exist.
An event is either earlier, at the same as, or later than another event.
No matter how you look at things, they are what they are.
As you sit there smugly in your certitude, I offer you one of three pills:
Any one of these pills will do exactly this: disabuse you of the idea that these habits of fact are anything other than habits acquired by upbringing, and evolved to allow you to cope with, maintain, and replicate, a humdrum life.
And this banality is important.
I’d hate for the town’s food supply, or my airline flight, to be under the control of a philosopher, a physicist, or Timothy Leary.
But because 99% of us consent to a humdrum existence, which begets and depends on a humdrum way of seeing the world, society has the luxury of allowing 1% of us to experience different habits of thoughts, and the different perspectives on reality that they reveal to us.
What a hoot!
PS: Of the three pills above, I prefer philosophy.
Physics: too much math.
LSD: too many chemicals.
But others would say, philosophy: too many words.
To each their own.

I just started studying physics at university a year ago, it makes me ask a lot more questions about just why everything works the way it does.
I'm starting to see the world in a more mathematical way and sometimes already seem to over complexify simple problems.
I often feel like I'm changing, I'm becoming more forgetful of simple everyday tasks, more and more clumsy which bothers me quite a bit.
My brain seems to be overwritten with math.
As for a philosopher, i don't see a lot of contribution coming from a physics study, as its 90% dry mathematics.
But there's a lot more to come, I'm just at the start of it and would probably write a completely different answer once I'm finished.

Updated: 09.07.2019 — 11:55 am

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *